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 Post subject: just when you've adapted to global warming......
PostPosted: Mon Aug 15, 2005 11:52 pm 
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now we have "global dimming".....sheesh

Global Dimming


source:


http://www.abc.net.au/4corners/content/ ... 328747.htm

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 Post subject: can you see the light?
PostPosted: Tue Aug 16, 2005 2:43 pm 
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I like that article. I had heard and read a report about the aftermath of 911 and the rise, after 911. To think that we are making Mirror clouds adds a new dimension to the global warming idea.

Bush can't ignore this much longer. Or, maybe he wants to. That is the point of starvation and food dependance is to cause this world problem.....


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PostPosted: Tue Aug 16, 2005 3:11 pm 
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speaking of 9-11...the dust clouds from the buildings was extremely toxic and should not have been inhaled. they did not tell the people of new york city to be careful in the aftermath, especially on how to clean up that toxic waste. they simply let people clean the best they could.

they found high traces of asbestos, lead, and numerous other chemicals that normally you would avoid at any cost. had this dust could happened in a smaller area, they would have had hazmat clean it.

i expect to see many cases of breathing problems in the future years with people of new york city.

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PostPosted: Fri Aug 19, 2005 2:18 pm 
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Yes, mga... the syndrome is called the World Trade Center cough, brought on because the EPA was instructed by the White House to inform the citizens of NYC that their air was safe to breathe a scant week after the twin towers fell.

As I sat transfixed watching the workers sift through the wreakage on my TV screen in those days after the event, I would yell at it...

WHERE ARE YOUR RESPIRATORS?

Of course, being 3000 miles away, they didn't hear me...

and mga... don't forget the pulverized glass...

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PostPosted: Sun Jan 01, 2006 1:03 pm 
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More heavy rain forecast for West Coast
One California man killed by falling tree

Sunday, January 1, 2006; Posted: 7:22 a.m. EST (12:22 GMT)


Napa Water Rescue personel carry a group of evacuees from a Wal-Mart on Saturday, in Napa, California.

GUERNEVILLE, California (AP) -- Northern California residents braced for a second storm to hit the region Sunday, a day after the first sent rivers spilling into cities and mud sliding into homes and on highways.

One man died Saturday when a storm-weakened eucalyptus tree toppled onto him, a woman suffered a broken leg when a mudslide destroyed her Santa Rosa home, and more than half a dozen people were rescued from rushing waters.

The Russian River near the Sonoma County town of Guerneville was a concern overnight, with waters quickly rising. The river was expected to crest at 45 feet -- 13 feet above flood stage.

"We are just very strongly recommending that people living in the lower areas lock up everything and go to higher ground," said Linda Eubanks of Sonoma County's Office of Emergency Services.

Officials sent high-water buses to pick up voluntary evacuees, but many chose to remain and ring in the New Year.

Maureen Weinstein hosted 10 friends and family members outside her Guerneville home, where they shot off fireworks, drank wine and listened to Motown.

"We live through [floods] a lot," Weinstein said, as the muddy river water hovered 10 feet away. "We're not that concerned this time because this year we have power and the Internet. I can monitor the water. It's wonderful."

The storm dumped an average of 4 to 5 inches in Northern California, with parts of Marin County recording more than 7 inches, according to the National Weather Service.

Sunday's storm was expected to drop another 2 inches in Northern California, up to 4 inches in Southern California's coastal valley and 8 inches in the mountains, forecasters said.

"It's looking pretty powerful," said NWS weather specialist Bonnie Bartling.

It also threatened to rain on Monday's Rose Parade in Pasadena for the first time since 1955.

On Saturday, at least six helicopter rescues were performed Saturday in Sonoma County. Firefighters rescued two people from a mobile home park, where 4 feet of rushing water washed at least one house off its foundation, fire officials said.

In the city of Napa, near the heart of wine country, the river rose 5 feet above flood stage, sending a surge of water to several blocks of downtown.

"We had so much water in such a short amount of time that manhole covers were popping all over the city," city councilman James Krider said.

Upstream in St. Helena, the Napa River reached a record 7 feet above flood stage before beginning to recede late Saturday. About 1,000 homes flooded, officials estimated.

In San Anselmo, the creek poured into as many as 70 downtown businesses, and two people rescued from the rising water were hospitalized with hypothermia, town administrator Debbie Stutsman said.

"The entire downtown area was under 4 1/2 feet of water," Stutsman said.

More than 600,000 Pacific Gas and Electric Co. customers from Bakersfield to the Oregon border experienced power outages, spokeswoman Claudia Mendoza said. About 110,000 customers remained without service early Sunday.

Mudslides closed several major roads, including Interstate 80 in the Sierra Nevada about 25 miles west of Reno. Six tractor-trailer rigs were caught in one slide on I-80 early Saturday, but no injuries were reported.

The interstate, the major corridor linking Northern California and points east, was expected to remain closed for at least two days, state officials said.

Copyright 2006 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

It never rains in California, it pours.
Meanwhile Texas has a drought.

Is this Global Warming, or Pat Robertson punishing people with his wrath.


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