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 Post subject: Former homeless vet speaks out
PostPosted: Mon Aug 22, 2005 5:58 pm 
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After one returns from war, what are the realities of appreciation and support they receive? On Democracy Now today, Ed Boyd talks about what is in store for many of these children and their parents.

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We hear a speech by former homeless veteran Ed Boyd. He says, "When the parade ends, and the military person takes off that uniform, and the horrors of war are still deep within them, and they can't get help because the Veterans Administration has got a $2 billion shortfall, they enter into a world of real terror, drug abuse, alcoholism, violence."

Saturday evening, hundreds of supporters gathered under a tent at the Camp Casey Two. Before a performance by Texas musician Steve Earl, activists, veterans and military families took to the stage to address the crowd.

Ed Boyd, former homeless veteran.

AMY GOODMAN: This is former homeless vet, Ed Boyd.

ED BOYD: I’ll tell you what I do in Baltimore, Maryland, and this is something that the news media refuse to tell, but I help counsel and I help deal with homeless veterans. Yes. When the parade ends, and the military person takes off that uniform, and the horrors of war is still deep within them, and they can't get help because the Veterans Administration has got -- has a $2 billion shortfall, and they enter into a world of real terror, drug abuse, alcoholism, violence in their -- against their families.

The same person that their parents sent off is not the same person that returns home, and no one talks about that. No one talks about the dreams that we have. No one talks about the anger. No one talks about what can I do. I hear the vets every day. They're coming back. They're coming home.

How in the world can you tell a 22-year-old man or a 22-year-old young lady that they're no good anymore because of what they have experienced, and they can't tell anybody? I look in the parents' eyes as they bring their kids. They say, “This is not little Johnny anymore.” That is the part they do not even talk about.

And why do I get involved with it, because at one time I was one of them. When I came back home, the horror that I saw and experienced, no one -- no one could understand. My mom could not understand where her son was. Physically I was all right. Mentally and spiritually, I was dead.

There are a lot of folks that are coming back home, and a lot of folks that are feeling the same way. And all our government has to do is say, ‘Suck it up, drink a beer and keep moving.’ I say no. We have to love our troops, and we love our kids. And we love our kids so much that we would do anything and everything in our power to keep them away from putting on them uniforms.

AMY GOODMAN: Former homeless vet, Ed Boyd. He now counsels homeless vets in Baltimore.


This is the tip of the iceberg. I heard that they are going to increase the returning veterans pay allotment as of today. Is it enough, or just a token for the service these people are subjected to, and the injustice of the trauma they face after returning home.

What are the figures for attempted and successful suicides and drug dependance that adds to the death figures from war? Does anybody really know or care? How are the families of these broken humans given support to help them cope with their lost and shattered children?

We need more Ed Boyds- people who have worked through the traumas of returning vets to help with the adjustments to civilian life after the friends and foes who's bodies remain as twisted memories of the real horrors of war. These are the people who can understand what has influenced the mind and can help those who have been internally scarred to accept the horror of participation in the most brutal form of psychosis man can inflict upon his fellow man- The Lust of the Eye, and Death of the Soul- WAR.


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 22, 2005 10:08 pm 
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It's the military education system that tolls the young. Mostly poor kids who have no other way out of their current situation. No way of getting a collage education / trade / high tech job .. etc. By joining, they get a roof over their heads, three squares a day and hopefully after training, a future job. If they manage to live long enough to benefit from it. Of course they might loose limbs or even their mind, so what good is that education then? Anyway, I'm sure I don't have to go on and show how the military could care less about these kids down the road. We know all about that. Sad!

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