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 Post subject: NY Times slams Bush's 'nasty and bumbling comments'
PostPosted: Wed Mar 21, 2007 8:46 am 
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NY Times slams Bush's 'nasty and bumbling comments' on US Attorney firings; Calls on Congress to subpoena Rove, others

Democratic leaders were right to reject an "unacceptable" offer presented by the White House on Tuesday which would allow unsworn testimony by White House officials behind closed doors, and should press on with planned subpoenas for Karl Rove and others, according to the lead editorial in Wednesday's New York Times.

"In nasty and bumbling comments made at the White House yesterday, President Bush declared that 'people just need to hear the truth' about the firing of eight United States attorneys," the Times editorial states. "That’s right. Unfortunately, the deal Mr. Bush offered Congress to make White House officials available for 'interviews' did not come close to meeting that standard."

In his address, Bush defended his administration's disclosure of an "unprecedented" amount of documents showing how the firing of those U.S. attorneys was handled. "There is no indication that anybody did anything improper," said Bush, asserting that Democrats were more interested in "scoring political points" than constructing an honest account of the firings.

The Times editorial continues, "Mr. Bush’s proposal was a formula for hiding the truth, and for protecting the president and his staff from a legitimate inquiry by Congress. Mr. Bush’s idea of openness involved sending White House officials to Congress to answer questions in private, without taking any oath, making a transcript or allowing any follow-up appearances. The people, in other words, would be kept in the dark."

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PostPosted: Wed Mar 21, 2007 4:44 pm 
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MORE EDITORIAL COMMENTS ABOUT BUSH'S LATEST ARROGANT BEHAVIOR:


[url=http://www.baltimoresun.com/news/opinion/oped/bal-op.schaller21mar21,0,4376269.story?coll=bal-oped-headlines]White House now exercising power without influence
[/url]


To understand how embattled President Bush has become, consider the difference between power and influence.

All presidents exercise inherent, formal powers. But not all are influential, because influence requires presidents to convince other politicians and the public. When presidents exercise power without influence, they lose their authority; they are reduced to the exertions of their office.

This is the situation confronting President Bush. With an approval rating hovering a few points above Richard Nixon's at his resignation, facing Democratic majorities at every level of government and rising criticism from fellow Republicans, he no longer has much influence.

But here's the thing: Mr. Bush never cared much about influence. From the beginning, he aimed to expand power by assertion, not persuasion. And this is why he finds himself in trouble again, this time over the firing of eight U.S. attorneys.

The firings are only the latest power grab by Republicans. The GOP understands that real power has less to do with election results than legal maneuvering. In fact, conservative lawyers worked hard during the last decade to limit presidential power, before promptly reversing course after Mr. Bush won:


During President Bill Clinton's final six years, the Republican-led majority in Congress issued more than 1,000 subpoenas to the White House; during Mr. Bush's first term, the Republicans issued none. Of course, this is the same Republican majority that took 140 hours of sworn testimony about alleged misuse of the Clintons' Christmas card list but a mere 12 hours on the Abu Ghraib prison scandal.

• During the 1990s, conservative lawyer Theodore B. Olson had a key role in the "Arkansas Project," which was tasked with digging up dirt on the Clintons. His reward for such unseemly behavior? Mr. Bush appointed him solicitor general, the country's highest-ranking lawyer, and Mr. Olson is rumored to be under consideration to replace Attorney General Alberto R. Gonzales if Mr. Gonzales resigns.

• At the president's request, a provision was added to the USA Patriot Act to allow the White House to replace U.S. attorneys without Senate confirmation.



READ MORE AT THE LINK.

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"Behind every great fortune lies a great crime."
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"Democrats work to help people who need help.
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That's all there is to it."

~Harry S. Truman


Last edited by Catherine on Fri Mar 23, 2007 5:29 am, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Thu Mar 22, 2007 5:12 am 
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this is what the neocons are all about...................pure unmitigated power that comes with the idea of absolutely no shread of accountability to anyone.

on a side note though i'm seein the uncanny resembence to the paranoid nixonian bunker mentality begin to creep in on the bushicons. the parallels between then and now are lining up hand in glove as we again witness the oft repeat of recorded history.

this scandal is only going to get bigger as the dems and eventually, for thier jobs sake, repugs begin to push for full disclosure of all the facts that bush is attempting to hide.

i'm also willing to bet that there are more scandals on the way allthough this one should be quite enough to finally put the fatal dagger into the chest of these assholes.

some interesting but yet troubling times ahead indeed.

flame 'em.

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PostPosted: Thu Mar 22, 2007 5:23 am 
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You're right, rooster, and I also agree with the comments made in this editorial from US News and World Report:

Quote:
It is time for the Democrats to play hardball with Republican senators up for re-election next year. They need to feel the heat of voters fed up with their tactics. Let's look at the GOP incumbents:

Sen. Gordon Smith of Oregon has already gotten the message with his stance on the war. Oregon is a fiercely independent state, and Smith knows it. Sens. John Sununu of New Hampshire and Norm Coleman of Minnesota are highly vulnerable.

New Hampshire's legislature turned Democratic last November in a major surprise. Sununu showed some courage in calling for Attorney General Alberto Gonzales to resign, but he remains intransigent on the war.

Coleman is an accidental incumbent. If popular Democrat Paul Wellstone hadn't been killed in an airplane accident just before the 2002 vote, Coleman would still be home in St. Paul. And Democrat Amy Klobuchar was elected by 20 points over her GOP opponent a few months ago to fill the state's other Senate seat.

With good candidate recruitment by Democrats, several other hawkish GOP senators should be getting queasy about next year.

That list includes Sens. Saxby Chambliss of Georgia, Elizabeth Dole of North Carolina, and even the venerable John Warner of Virginia, who may retire rather than run for a sixth term. Sen. Wayne Allard of Colorado has already called it quits.

Even a moderate like Sen. Susan Collins of Maine should be challenged earnestly by the Democrats. On the war issue, a moderate is out of sync.

How about Sen. Sam Brownback of Kansas, who is running for president right now? He will probably be forced out of the race in time to run for another term, but he should be tested.

With a Bush legacy around their necks, Republicans should be in jeopardy. The next Senate in 2009 may look vastly different from the current 51-49 majority for the Democrats.


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"Democrats work to help people who need help.
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That's all there is to it."

~Harry S. Truman


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PostPosted: Fri Mar 23, 2007 12:45 am 
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It is high time to play hard ball with the GOP, as they are not listening.

Also, the rule of law should be followed. So, the executive branch is subject to review and oversight by the legislative branch.


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PostPosted: Fri Mar 23, 2007 2:36 am 
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will in chicago wrote:
It is high time to play hard ball with the GOP, as they are not listening.

Also, the rule of law should be followed. So, the executive branch is subject to review and oversight by the legislative branch.


What? You mean that quaint old notion of "equal branches of government" and "checks and balances"?

That is sooooo pre-Twenty First Century.

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PostPosted: Fri Mar 23, 2007 3:20 am 
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shoeless wrote:
will in chicago wrote:
It is high time to play hard ball with the GOP, as they are not listening.

Also, the rule of law should be followed. So, the executive branch is subject to review and oversight by the legislative branch.


What? You mean that quaint old notion of "equal branches of government" and "checks and balances"?

That is sooooo pre-Twenty First Century.

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Bush is a man for the 21st Century --- the 21st Century B.C.E. (Before Common Era.) Ah, this explains everything -- Bush was born 42 centuries too late. :lol:


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