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 Post subject: Men & Depression: Facing Darkness
PostPosted: Mon Feb 19, 2007 3:47 am 
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This is a tough thing for men to face, but it is important that men understand that it is curable and is not a disgrace or embarrassment. It has always been identified as a "womans" disease because they are "emotional". Most doctors didn't recognize the obvious symptoms that men were giving. Guess why!

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/17190411/site/newsweek/
Men & Depression: New Treatments

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Although depression is emotionally crippling and has numerous medical implications—some of them deadly—many men fail to recognize the symptoms. Instead of talking about their feelings, men may mask them with alcohol, drug abuse, gambling, anger or by becoming workaholics. And even when they do realize they have a problem, men often view asking for help as an admission of weakness, a betrayal of their male identities.

The result is a hidden epidemic of despair that is destroying marriages, disrupting careers, filling jail cells, clogging emergency rooms and costing society billions of dollars in lost productivity and medical bills. It is also creating a cohort of children who carry the burden of their fathers' pain for the rest of their lives. The Gary Cooper model of manhood—what Tony Soprano called "the strong, silent type" to his psychiatrist, Dr. Melfi—is so deeply embedded in our social psyche that some men would rather kill themselves than confront the fact that they feel despondent, inadequate or helpless. "Our definition of a successful man in this culture does not include being depressed, down or sad," says Michael Addis, chair of psychology at Clark University in Massachusetts. "In many ways it's the exact opposite. A successful man is always up, positive, in charge and in control of his emotions."..........For decades, psychologists believed that men experienced depression at only a fraction of the rate of women. But this overly rosy view, doctors now recognize, was due to the fact that men were better at hiding their feelings. Depressed women often weep and talk about feeling bad; depressed men are more likely to get into bar fights, scream at their wives, have affairs or become enraged by small inconveniences like lousy service at a restaurant. "Men's irritability is usually seen as a character flaw," says Harvard Medical School's William Pollack, "not as a sign of depression." In many cases, however, that's exactly what it is: depression.


Could it be that men repressing their emotions, is a contributing factor and unlike women, the opposite effect is elicited. Instead of crying, anger frustration and violence- what is known as "Blowing off a little steam" and a "character flaw". Seems we have another reason not to hit our children- as we pass along our coping skills to the next generation.

This is a 6 page article but is worth reading and knowing that help is a phone call away.

Take the test at the bottom of the page to see if you have symptoms of depression.

http://depression-screening.org/screeni ... ngtest.htm

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 Post subject: Depression has mutliple faces
PostPosted: Tue Apr 24, 2007 8:29 am 
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I am a bipolar alcoholic. Before I started sobriety at little over 21 years ago, my daily consumption of booze self medicated (masked) my symptoms. :drunken: After getting sober, I would have long bouts of depression :cry: but the most insidious thing about these bouts was it wasn't until after they were over that I realized I was depressed. I did not seek help for many years because when I realized I had had a bout I was feeling fine. When I finally did seek help, I was so fearful of any drug that was a good ten years before I got the treatment I needed. The key was find a shrink that worked with alcoholics and realized that bipolar disease very often goes hand in hand with alcoholism. I am Type II bipolar, which means I am never hyper-manic but have hypo-manic episodes. I was able to work 20-hour days and was at my most creative during hypomania. The price I paid was when I came down was the depressions were long and severe. Now with proper maintenance I keep a more even keel most of the time.

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