It is currently Sun Apr 20, 2014 4:00 pm

All times are UTC - 4 hours [ DST ]




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 4 posts ] 
Author Message
 Post subject: another random science question
PostPosted: Tue Feb 12, 2008 11:28 am 
Offline
Moderator
Moderator
User avatar

Joined: Thu Aug 31, 2006 10:03 am
Posts: 1469
Location: Bible Belt, MS
So, ever since I was a kid I've always wondered about this sort of odd idea:

Considering that matter is neither created nor destroyed, does the earth weigh right now the same as it did at conception? Or at least at the completion of the formation of the ozone layer?


Then supposing that the earth does weigh relatively the same, how does it effect the rotation of the earth, orbit of the earth when we do remove weight from our sphere by sending things into space?

_________________
You can sing the praises of women all day long, but as long as you put a fertilized egg ahead of [their] welfare, you do not really care about them.-Dori 4/07


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: another random science question
PostPosted: Tue Feb 12, 2008 1:27 pm 
Offline
Hear Me Roar!
User avatar

Joined: Tue Oct 10, 2006 8:50 pm
Posts: 364
Location: Syracuse, Ny
lefty wrote:
So, ever since I was a kid I've always wondered about this sort of odd idea:

Considering that matter is neither created nor destroyed, does the earth weigh right now the same as it did at conception? Or at least at the completion of the formation of the ozone layer?
More! we are bombarded daily with cosmic crap.


Quote:
Then supposing that the earth does weigh relatively the same, how does it effect the rotation of the earth, orbit of the earth when we do remove weight from our sphere by sending things into space?
The mass has little effect on rotation. The moon and geological forces have a much larger effect.

The mass of the earth is about 6,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000kg.
Its calculated by using the acceleration due to gravity time the radius squared all divided by the gravitational constant.

_________________
"To argue with a man who has renounced the use and authority of reason, is like administering medicine to the dead." -- THOMAS PAINE


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: another random science question
PostPosted: Tue Feb 12, 2008 2:17 pm 
Offline
SuperMember!
SuperMember!
User avatar

Joined: Wed Feb 09, 2005 1:53 am
Posts: 2541
Location: Illinois
lefty wrote:
Then supposing that the earth does weigh relatively the same, how does it effect the rotation of the earth, orbit of the earth when we do remove weight from our sphere by sending things into space?


Also, the rotation of the Earth has been slowing throughout its history. The first days were only 6.5 hours!

"The Geophysical Effects of the Earth's Slowing Rotation!"

Did the fast spinning Earth have a ring around it when it was very young?

When the Earth was very young, its faster rotation caused it to have a much larger equatorial circumference than it has at the present time. It may have been spinning fast enough to have a "Saturn type ring" around it.

It is well known that the rotation of planet Earth is gradually slowing. For four and one half billion years, its entire lifetime, its rate of rotation has been gradually slowing. As the Earth loses its kinetic energy due to all forms of friction acting on it; tides, galactic space dust, solar wind, space weather, geomagnetic storms, etc., like any flywheel, it will slow down. (The space surrounding the planet is far from empty).

...over the course of the planet's entire lifetime, it has had very profound effects on the geophysics of the planet.

It has caused mountains to rise, earthquakes, etc. to occur as we will see. This article is about, factoring in the tremendous geophysical activity that was caused, by the Earth's slowing rotation, in the interior of the planet, its crust, oceans and atmosphere over its entire lifetime.

Tracing these tiny milliseconds back for 4.5 billion years adds up to a very significant amount of time for a solar day. I have determined that the day/night rotation was 63,000 seconds shorter than the present 86,400 seconds it is today. This would put the Earth's rotation at about 6.5 hours per day/night cycle, when it was created, 4.5 billion years ago. (This is a much faster rate of rotation than the Cassini-Huygens mission (2003 to 2004) determined Saturn's 10.5 hours rotation period to be.)


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: another random science question
PostPosted: Wed Feb 13, 2008 12:43 am 
Offline
Moderator
Moderator
User avatar

Joined: Sun Sep 03, 2006 6:42 am
Posts: 2045
Location: Surprise, AZ USA
lefty wrote:
Considering that matter is neither created nor destroyed,


This is true for normal chemical reactions. Einstein and his E=mc squared equation shows that matter can be converted to energy or vice versa. The nuclear age has brought about implications that weren't there before. The sun constantly uses up its mass by converting it to energy through its nuclear furnace. The Earth didn't have massive nuclear reactions until 1945; Pandora has left the box and will we ever get the genie back in the bottle? (Sorry about the mixed metaphors.)

_________________
I'm not a member of any organized party. I'm a Democrat.”-Will Rogers

A Proud Liberal...This Day in History...Namnesia Antidote


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 4 posts ] 

All times are UTC - 4 hours [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
cron
Blue Moon by Trent © 2007
Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group