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 Post subject: Bush On Roll--Negroponte as NEW Intel Czar
PostPosted: Thu Feb 17, 2005 2:26 pm 
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The death squad hero of Honduras, promoted to Ambassador of Iraq for his killing prowess, is now the NEW INTelligence(?) Honcho. Boy, we are in trouble now.

All this ONE DAY after Gossinstein tells the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence(?) that the NEW THREAT from al Quaida {MAY} come in the form of biological, chemical or nuclear terrorism for Amerika.

Quietly, the Repubs have said that this threat will be SIGNIFICANTLY reduced IF the Pres gets his way with Congress and lots of money to fight this nasty terrorism. Fear fear fear fear....hey, it worked for the Nazi's why shouldn't it work for Bush?

John

http://www.thebostonchannel.com/news/42 ... etail.html

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PostPosted: Thu Feb 17, 2005 5:53 pm 
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For Immediate Release



Statement of September 11th Advocates
On the Appointment of John Negroponte to
Director of National Intelligence

February 17, 2005




Today President Bush appointed John Negroponte to the post of Director of National Intelligence (DNI). While Mr. Negroponte has a long history of holding diplomatic posts, we have serious reservations about Mr. Negroponte’s skills and experience in the intelligence arena. Moreover, we do not need an appeaser in the position of DNI. We need a strong personality with an acute awareness of intelligence who will be capable of providing unvarnished intelligence to the President.

Specifically, President Bush stated that Mr. Negroponte was the best person to fill this post because he stared the enemy in the eye as Ambassador to Iraq. Respectfully, Iraq is far from an intelligence success. And, more importantly, what actual recent intelligence experience does Mr. Negroponte have? While Mr. Negroponte served on the National Security Council during the late 80’s, threats to national security have evolved and transformed since that time.

According to the 9/11 Commission, “the DNI will oversee national intelligence centers to provide all source analysis and plan intelligence operations for the whole government on major problems”. The DNI will be the coordinator of 15 existing intelligence agencies. He will have to have a strong understanding of how intelligence works and how pieces of intelligence fit together in order to present a complete picture to the president. Yet, how does Mr. Negroponte’s career as a diplomat qualify him to handle this enormous job?

It is paramount that the individual who fills the role of National Intelligence Director understand intelligence collection, analysis and resultant tasking. They must also understand how to set and allocate intelligence community budgets. The failure of former National Security Advisor Condoleezza Rice to properly coordinate and task all 15 of our nation’s intelligence agencies before 9/11 undoubtedly contributed to the vast devastation of 9/11, which is why we need a DNI. But, by placing another career diplomat in charge of national security, is President Bush not making the same mistake as he did when he appointed Condoleezza Rice as his National Security Advisor?

Notably, the 9/11 Commission stated in Staff Statement 10, “Threats and Responses in 2001”, that Condoleezza Rice and Stephen Hadley (our new National Security Advisor) did not feel, prior to 9/11, that “they had the job of handling domestic security.” Yet, the job description and the mere moniker itself, “National Security Advisor,” has always clearly stated that the National Security Advisor is the President's principal person for considering national security and foreign policy matters. Perhaps, Ms. Rice’s failure to adequately understand and carryout her job responsibilities before 9/11 might have been caused by her relative inexperience in the intelligence arena coupled with the fact that she was a specialist in diplomacy not intelligence.

The 9/11 families fought for the creation of the position of Director of National Intelligence so that going forward America would have one person knowingly responsible and therefore ultimately accountable for domestic security.

We worry that Mr. Negroponte suffers from the same flaws as Ms. Rice. After hearing yesterday’s grim threat assessment from CIA Director Porter Goss and FBI Director Robert Mueller that we are going to be attacked again, we question whether Mr. Negroponte is the best person suited for this job. His resume is strongly tilted towards years of diplomatic service and is clearly lacking in recent intelligence community experience. Such a resume does not seem to afford Mr. Negroponte the ultimate skills required by this nation’s top intelligence post. We hope that lives are not lost by repeating past mistakes.

####


September 11th Advocates

Kristen Breitweiser
Patty Casazza
Monica Gabrielle
Mindy Kleinberg
Lorie VanAuken

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It is dangerous to be right when your government is wrong.--Voltaire

You may choose to ignore the facts, but you cannot change the facts --Author Unknown


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PostPosted: Sat Feb 19, 2005 1:18 pm 
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The Guardian UK: What the papers say:

'He may be just the right man'

George Bush wants John Negroponte to reform security agencies

Saturday February 19, 2005
The Guardian

Denver Post
Editorial, February 18

"John Negroponte's nomination as director of national intelligence shows considerable finesse, not only because of the extensive experience he brings to the assignment but because of the professional imprint George Bush has put on the new office at its inception.

"Last year, Congress acted on recommendations of the September 11 commission and created the position to improve coordination among the nation's 15 intelligence agencies ... Some intelligence observers worried that Mr Bush would nominate a political operative that cabinet officers could bend to their will ... [But] Mr Negroponte isn't a creation of the president, and so he will be all the more valuable to him. For four decades, he has served in a mix of assignments in eight countries and on three continents, from the Vietnam war peace talks to, currently, US ambassador to Iraq."

Ralph Peters
New York Post, February 18

"Normally, a diplomat would be a terrible choice to drive intel reform. Too many diplos just don't have the punch to make things happen. Mr Negroponte's different. He's a hitter. With experience in Honduras during Central America's years of crisis, as well as in Mexico, the Philippines, the UN and now Iraq, this guy knows what it means to be blindsided by bad intel...

"He may be just the right man to provide top cover for Porter Goss, the director of central intelligence, who's been shaking up the CIA ... Mr Goss's purges ... may have embittered careerists, but they were essential. Mr Negroponte will have to do the same for the entire system. If heads don't roll, nothing changes. Let the axe fall."

Ronald A Marks
Washington Times, February 18


"The first qualification Mr Negroponte brings to the job is the most important - the president's trust ... Mr Negroponte's ability to maintain balance under fire, and handle, but not be overwhelmed by, the details and deal with inter-agency turf battles is well known...

"He also received the most important power a president can bestow - the power of the budget and programme. [On Thursday, Mr Bush] made clear that Mr Negroponte and he alone would decide what budgets the 15 intelligence agencies would have and what common standards, practices and programmes they would execute ... The power of the budget and the programme are crucial in this town. Mr Negroponte has it."

New York Times
Editorial, February 18


"Mr Negroponte ... would bring many strong qualifications to the job ... What he has not consistently demonstrated is the kind of bedrock commitment to democratic values, professional independence and frank relations with Congress that he will need to successfully do a job whose powers have already been dangerously diluted...

"As envisioned by the 9/11 commission, the intelligence director was supposed to impose order and coordination on the work of ... 15 spy agencies, whose rivalries in the months leading up to the catastrophic al-Qaida attacks proved so damaging. Now, thanks to tireless Pentagon lobbying, craven Congressional back-room dealing and a lack of firm leadership from the White House, the new intelligence director will have to do this without the full hiring, firing and budgeting authority that ought to go with the job. That leaves Mr Negroponte facing gruelling turf battles with the defence secretary, Donald Rumsfeld, as a major feature of the new job."

USA Today
Editorial, February 18

"To succeed, Mr Negroponte will need a quality rare in government: the guts to tell officials, including the president, things they don't want to hear. He'll also have to prove he can run something as big as the nation's vast intelligence system. He has been a consumer of intelligence, but never a provider...

"History is ... against him. President Harry Truman tried a similar reorganisation more than 50 years ago. The head of the CIA, created then, was supposed to lead the nation's intelligence operations. It never worked that way. Other fiefdoms were created and thrived. Today, about 80% of the nation's intelligence budget is controlled by the Pentagon."

Los Angeles Times
Editorial, February 18

"It isn't clear how the new directorate, no matter who runs it, will substantially improve the performance of the FBI, CIA, defence intelligence agency, national security agency and kindred bureaucracies. The department of homeland security ... has shown that moving pieces around the chessboard isn't likely to resolve long-standing tensions between ... agencies."

Economist.com
Analysis, February 18

"Now Mr Negroponte will be ... a powerful adviser and boss. But boss of what, exactly? ... He will personally command no battalions, control no field agents. Will this mean that he is too close to the president and too disconnected from the spies and analysts who do the actual intelligence work? Many believe that intelligence was politicised in the run-up to the Iraq war, with the 'correct' answers handed from the top down, not from the ground troops up. How well Mr Negroponte spans the gap between listening to the myriad agencies and deciding what to tell the president will be crucial to his success."




Society of Professional Journalists : Code of Ethics

Preamble
Members of the Society of Professional Journalists believe that public enlightenment is the forerunner of justice and the foundation of democracy. The duty of the journalist is to further those ends by seeking truth and providing a fair and comprehensive account of events and issues. Conscientious journalists from all media and specialties strive to serve the public with thoroughness and honesty. Professional integrity is the cornerstone of a journalist's credibility. Members of the Society share a dedication to ethical behavior and adopt this code to declare the Society's principles and standards of practice.

Traude

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Every man is guilty of all the good he did not do.
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PostPosted: Sat Feb 19, 2005 9:24 pm 
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Hmmm, so Negroponte will be taking care of the money but not the actual intelligence agencies. And he was part of the great and wonderful Iran/Contra adventure.

Guess Bush will have all the drugs he wants for the next few years, eh?

And this part I assume is a good ol' U.S. of A. joke:

Quote:
Society of Professional Journalists : Code of Ethics

Preamble
Members of the Society of Professional Journalists believe that public enlightenment is the forerunner of justice and the foundation of democracy. The duty of the journalist is to further those ends by seeking truth and providing a fair and comprehensive account of events and issues. Conscientious journalists from all media and specialties strive to serve the public with thoroughness and honesty. Professional integrity is the cornerstone of a journalist's credibility. Members of the Society share a dedication to ethical behavior and adopt this code to declare the Society's principles and standards of practice.


Where did we/they go wrong?


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PostPosted: Sat Feb 19, 2005 9:25 pm 
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Hmmm, so Negroponte will be taking care of the money but not the actual intelligence agencies. And he was part of the great and wonderful Iran/Contra adventure.

Guess Bush will have all the drugs he wants for the next few years, eh?

And this part I assume is a good ol' U.S. of A. joke:

Quote:
Society of Professional Journalists : Code of Ethics

Preamble
Members of the Society of Professional Journalists believe that public enlightenment is the forerunner of justice and the foundation of democracy. The duty of the journalist is to further those ends by seeking truth and providing a fair and comprehensive account of events and issues. Conscientious journalists from all media and specialties strive to serve the public with thoroughness and honesty. Professional integrity is the cornerstone of a journalist's credibility. Members of the Society share a dedication to ethical behavior and adopt this code to declare the Society's principles and standards of practice.


Where did we/they go wrong?


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