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 Post subject: World Trade Center
PostPosted: Wed Aug 23, 2006 8:20 pm 
The Oliver Stone film World Trade Center sucks. To watch this film, you would think that every citizen of the United States is a self-absorbed, middle-class moron who can neither deal with death nor show caring toward her peers. I don't know if that's sick because it's true, or if that's sick because it's a stereotype. (The film suggests that the stereotype is true.)

The sound story-telling foundation of World Trade Center collapses in a controlled demolition of disjointed stereotypes and anecdotes, among the most disturbing of which are the enormous "memory hole" surrounding the collapse of the three World Trade Center buildings themselves and the re-instated marine's unsolicited soundbyte at the end: "We're going to avenge this."

World Trade Center, the film, is a simple survival story, poorly done, with the totality of 9/11's political significance surgically removed -- to the universal applause of the corporate media gatekeepers. The implied, and therefore ultimate, message of the film is that the global destruction of human civilization due to individual personal weakness in the face of peer pressure is a foregone conclusion and that for the rest of our lives we will be not in "a race against time," as Webster Tarpley said at the L.A. conference, to stop the Secret Team, but merely in a protracted salvage operation to carve out from the rubble of civilization some little island of genuine humanity for ourselves and our children before we die. And this depressing message -- the only one left standing at the end of the movie -- is somehow Oliver Stone's idea of healing the nation five years after 9/11. Do you feel healed?

-GR


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PostPosted: Wed Aug 23, 2006 8:40 pm 
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Nice review. I have not seen the movie nor do I have an intention of seeing it. To me it is just a political statement to give more meaning to the war in Iraq.

I am still feeling slighted because the people who died in the Pentagon seem to be forgotten. Could it be because they were working men and woman and some of them service people and the ones that died in the towers were a bit higher up on the chain?

Could it also be that the average person received 4 million dollars from the contributions that were raised and then asked for more, while those in DC received only the normal insurance money.

Excuse me if I sound bitter , but, the Pentagon got nothing and O City did not anything either. What made them so different?


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PostPosted: Wed Aug 23, 2006 8:46 pm 
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THANK YOU, THANK YOU, THANK YOU, GlassRace. I did not want to see this movie. I refuse to return to that day. I do not think today like I did in 2001. I do not believe today what I believed on that day.

What I believe now is much, much closer to the actual truth. I refuse to pay good money to see the root-cause of what ultimately led to America becoming a nation that is sullied, smeared, tarnished, and still being led by the smirking chimp that allowed that dastardly attack to happen.

Oliver Stone can go fuck himself.

Catherine

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PostPosted: Wed Aug 23, 2006 11:01 pm 
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Cat tell us how you really feel. :lol:


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PostPosted: Thu Aug 24, 2006 12:16 am 
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I have no intention of going to see it. I figure it is paid for by some Rep. group to try to make everyone feel all "warm and fuzzy" and bring Bushit's ratings up.

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PostPosted: Thu Aug 24, 2006 12:39 am 
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I remember when Oliver Stone got a bunch of crap for Platoon and Born on the Fourth of July. Mr. anti war liberal now being called a hero on Fox News for making 911 look like it was supposed to look like. Sorry, wont see it. Nor United 93 either. I dont like fantasies.

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 Post subject: Thank You . . . and a note on the Victims Fund
PostPosted: Fri Aug 25, 2006 5:14 pm 
Goodness! Thank you very much! I appreciate the replies, and glad to have saved you some money -- and aggravation.

DarkKnight2 mentioned about the victims fund, and that is something I have a little info on, based on the book written by the fund master, and related interviews. Not only were some families forgotten more than others, the military families tended to have a much better attitude than some of the other families. You would think a good attitude is supposed to be rewarded.

I've concluded that the whole victims' fund scenario was nothing but Nixonesque hush money. I see it as a "pennies on the dollar" cost/benefit analysis contrived by the neocons, and their masters in the Secret Team. While the money paid out will certainly help a lot of people, hopefully the children who lost parents above all else, the gesture is not anywhere close to as sincere and caring as it may appear to be to the unsuspecting public.

BTW, Catherine, your post rocked! Nice to see some strong writing on the internet for a change.

GlassRace wrote:
Original post date 11 Oct 2005 by Glass Race.

Edited by Glass Race.

___

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What is Life Worth? The Unprecedented Effort to Compensate the Victims of 9/11 is Kenneth R. Feinberg's book about his unprecedented experience as the special paymaster who oversaw the indemnifying of the Victim Compensation Fund to the 9/11 families.

The job took 3 years, he did it pro bono, and it was a grinder, psychologically. And priceless as a source of personal wisdom for all the above reasons.

I first heard him during a Fresh Air interview I happened to catch. It's an excellent interview and can be heard here

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=4700911

He was on C-SPAN as well, but I recall getting more from the radio interview posted above.

And a blurb on the book

http://www.publicaffairsbooks.com/publicaffairsbooks-cgi-bin/display?book=1586483234

It will be impossible to consider this work fully without getting into some really deep commentary about American society itself. And ultimately ourselves. The radical challenges we've inherited without always realizing it.
___

EXCERPT - Different Expectations, Different Values

The following is an excerpt from What is Life Worth? pp. 56-59

Not all town hall meetings were bitter or confrontational. Actually their atmosphere and tone varied dramatically depending on the location. In New York, anger and frustration usually boiled over. Families demanded greater compensation. Sometimes, they attacked me personally. "I spit on you and your children," said the widow of one firefighter, incensed that she was receiving less money because of life insurance offsets.

Many New Yorkers seemed to feel that their justifiable anger over the attacks entitled them to increased payment, as if the money was a form of reparations for the failure of federal government to protect its citizens. This attitude became apparent when I hosted a series of group meetings in the basement of my law firm's Manhattan office building on East 49th Street. We gathered in a large, movie-style auditorium reserved for tenant conferences. One day I would meet with as many as two hundred of New York City firefighters and policemen, the next day with Cantor Fitzgerald spouses, a third day with the families of foreign workers or members of a Hispanic or Korean 9/11 family association.

Informality and casual attire characterized these meetings. I welcomed the guests and explained the program and the limitations imposed on me by the statute. I tried to anticipate the most obvious questions about eligibility and compensation. To encourage a candid exchange of views, I made it clear that these sessions with the families were off the record (no transcript or tape recordings were made of the discussion).

All seemed well until I invited questions from the audience. Then the floodgates opened, releasing a torrent of invective and anger aimed directly at me. It became very personal. "Mr. Feinberg, you have discretion. So exercise it and give us our due," one family member said. Family after family accused me of devaluing the life of a husband or daughter, of failing to recognize the victim's true worth, of engaging in a coldhearted calculation of dollars and cents when I should be focusing on the uniqueness and human qualities of the deceased. "How can you be so insensitive, so detached, so unwilling to understand the human qualities of my dead wife? How can the government be so callous?" one survivor shouted.

It was tough to stay calm when barraged by these attacks. But I realized that a raised voice or an angry rejoinder would only heighten tensions and provoke an even stronger reaction in the room. I also knew that if I buckled under the pressure and promised what I couldn't deliver, I'd create worse problems in the long run. So I pledged to listen to every argument, to respond with understanding and sympathy to every complaint, and to extend the meetings as long as necessary for everyone to be heard.

My willingness to stand up to the criticism from family members reinforcing each other's confrontational attitudes eventually led to a more substantive discussion of the program. It was as if the families, after venting their frustration and anger at me, then acknowledged the necessity of quietly and calmly learning more about the program. The meetings ended with a promise to reconvene the group for further discussion. More than one family member would take me aside before leaving the building to quietly thank me for listening and expressing support. "And I'm sorry, Mr. Feinberg," they'd often add, "for what you had to put up with during the meeting. I know you're only trying to help."

In Virginia, the environment could not have been more different. Dealing with military families almost guaranteed a certain degree of respect and military decorum. I learned that military families develop a certain insularity, especially in times of grief, and circle the wagons to provide each other emotional comfort and support. They seemed to speak with one voice, recognizing that, as military families, they stood with their lost loved ones in harm's way. They rarely asked a personal question pertaining to their own individual circumstances; instead, they focused on issues of general importance to the entire group.

The tone of the Virginia meetings was remarkably civil. "Sir, I have a question," was the common introductory phrase when I met with families in a hotel room less than a mile from the Pentagon. "Thank you" was almost always the response after my answer. There were no invectives, no indictments, no demands; instead a collective hush fell over the gathering. A series of reasonable questions followed concerning the technicalities of the program. How would I treat military housing and travel allowances in calculating awards? Would I take into account the likelihood of the victim receiving a military promotion? How would I treat military pensions and anticipated battle pay? Occasionally I heard the sound of stifled weeping in the crowd.

At the conclusion of one meeting attended by about two hundred people, I was presented a framed certificate of thanks from the Pentagon families. I was touched and expressed my deep appreciation, explaining to the families that their act of kindness was a first in my administration of the fund. I reminded them that we were all in this together. Although I could never stand in their shoes or fully appreciate the measure of their loss, I would do all I could to vindicate their trust in me. They were grateful for the government's largesse and they thanked me warmly for my willingness to visit them and explain the program.

California was different still. . . .




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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Aug 25, 2006 5:57 pm 
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Wow, being a retired military man myself, I read the small brief. I shed a few tears once again, for those that have died. I will this weekend look for that book. Thank you for sharing it.

It is not that I am real bitter about the WTC. It is just that wheneve there are military involved some seem to simply forget that their wives, girlfriends, sons and brothers have feelings also. I get upset when some say, well they knew what they were getting into. Those that served in the Pentagon had done their time, this was a place were war was not suppose to come and yet it did. I believe not from terrorist but, from or because of our own government. Soldiers have always been forgotten, until the next war comes along.

The bat sits in the closet,
it is not used anymore
The glove is there also
gathering the dust
A ball, slightly used
with marks of black
A little boy sits on his bed
A picture in his hand, a tear in his eye
His daddy won't be back
He died in a war.


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 Post subject: Was it part of the plan?
PostPosted: Fri Sep 08, 2006 6:36 pm 
Stone Weighing Up Second 9/11 Movie

http://www.prisonplanet.com/articles/Se ... 6Stone.htm

http://film.guardian.co.uk/news/story/0 ... 73,00.html


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Sep 11, 2006 10:39 am 
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Stone has drunk the kool-aid.

Pretty soon that great big, famous HOLLYWOOD sign will be sporting a cross and a big open book that will obviously be a BIBLE. On each side of HOLLYWOOD will be a statue of Jesus that's bigger than the Statue of Liberty.

Geez..those fornicating movie stars will have to stop all that nonsense, except just to reproduce! :P



Catherine

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"Behind every great fortune lies a great crime."
Honore de Balzac

"Democrats work to help people who need help.
That other party, they work for people who don't need help.
That's all there is to it."

~Harry S. Truman


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Sep 12, 2006 6:35 am 
Catherine wrote:
Stone has drunk the kool-aid.


Or maybe he's learned how to lie with ease, like every professional politician currently in power. These old men have an amazing ability to keep the truth to themselves, based on any given agenda, or just a sense of timing. I'm not disagreeing with your statement, Cat, but it's just . . . interesting.

PRESS CONFERENCE QUOTE

At his press conference, Stone accused President George W. Bush of mishandling the fight against Bin Laden's militants and using the crisis to stoke fear and bolster his own power at home in a way that was "right out of George Orwell."

"I think there's been an abuse of the powers of government," he said.


http://newsinfo.inq7.net/breakingnews/w ... e_id=20403


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