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Alaska Natives: Our fight to survive

Alaska natives: Our fight to survive

Alaska is usually in the news for one of two reasons: its oil industry or climate change, or sometimes both.

While the effects of climate change - permafrost melting and villages along the coastline eroding away - are real, for Alaska, whose economy has thrived on oil for the past 50 years, simply stopping the drilling for oil is out of the question.

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Ash Fills The Sky As Bali's Mount Agung Erupts

Ash fills the sky as Bali's Mt. Agung erupts

Clouds of ash filled the air around Bali's Mount Agung after the volcano erupted on Saturday and multiple times on Sunday.

Indonesia's National Disaster Management Authority said dark gray clouds reached heights of more than 13,000 feet in the air around the volcano, located in the east of the Indonesian island.

"Bali is safe just keep away from disaster prone areas," the agency wrote on Twitter.

The government agency warned people within about 4 miles of the volcano to leave. It said ash as thick as half a centimeter was reported in several nearby villages, The Associated Press says, while soldiers and police handed out masks.

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The Sea Level Threat To Cities Depends On Where The Ice Melts — Not Just How Fast

Sea level threat to cities depends on how far and how fast the ice is melting

The world's oceans are rising. Over the past century, they're up an average of about eight inches. But the seas are rising more in some places than others. And scientists are now finding that how much sea level rises in, say, New York City, has a lot to do with exactly where the ice is melting.

A warming climate is melting a lot of glaciers and ice sheets on land. That means more water rolling down into the oceans.

But the oceans are not like a bathtub. The water doesn't rise uniformly.

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Keystone XL pipeline wins green light in Nebraska

Keystone pipeline approved in NebraskaNebraska regulators approved the Keystone XL pipeline Monday, clearing the last big regulatory hurdle for the controversial oil project after nearly a decade of bitter protests from environmentalists and landowners and delivering a win for President Donald Trump's drive for U.S. "energy dominance."

The Nebraska Public Service Commission voted 3-2 to approve the route through the state for the pipeline that will transport up to 830,000 barrels per day of crude from Canada's oil sands and North Dakota's shale fields to oil refineries on the Gulf Coast. Former President Barack Obama had blocked the permits for the pipeline in 2015, citing the oil sands' impact on climate change, but Trump quickly reversed that decision after taking office.

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Trump's elephant trophy reversal comes as a surprise to administration employees, interest groups

Trump faced public and political pressure over rescinding elephant trophy banPresident Donald Trump's move late Friday night to postpone a decision to allow the import of elephant hunting trophies from two African countries came as a surprise not only to interest groups, but also the US Fish and Wildlife Service employees who oversaw the proposed change in policy, a source with knowledge of the agency's process told CNN.

Agency employees responsible for recommending the change found out that it had been placed under review at the same time the public did: when the President tweeted out his decision, the source said.

Keystone pipeline shut down after leaking 210,000 gallons of oil in South Dakota

Keystone pipeline leaks 210,000 of ooil in South Dakota

TransCanada Corp.'s Keystone pipeline leaked an estimated 210,000 gallons of oil in northeastern South Dakota, the company and state regulators reported Thursday.

Crews shut down the pipeline Thursday morning and activated emergency response procedures after a drop in pressure was detected resulting from the leak south of a pump station in Marshall County, TransCanada said in a statement. The cause was being investigated.

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NASA considers which cities will flood as ice sheets melts

NASA : NYC first to flood as Antarctic ice sheets meltAs ice sheets on Greenland and Antartica melt, which cities are most liable to flood? NASA scientists have built a new simulation to help coastal planners find answers.

Scientists know where meltwater will enter the ocean, but a combination of factors determining where that excess water will end up is more complicated.

The new simulation analyzes the planet's spin rate and gravitational field to more accurately predict how meltwater will be redistributed globally -- revealing where sea levels will rise most dramatically.

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